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When You Hit Your Funny Bone, It’s Not Funny!

If you’re like me, you’ve hit your funny bone more than a few times in your life. It happens when you bang the inside part of your elbow on the edge of a table or other hard object. Pain and tingling shoot into your hand and sometimes it causes numbness that takes a while to go away.

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Tennis Elbow Video – Where is the Pain?

lady with tennis elbow pain

Tennis elbow is on the outside part of the elbow - check out the video!

In this video, I’ll show you where tennis elbow is.

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Motion of the Fingers, Thumb, and Wrist – Language of Hand and Arm Surgery Series

motion of the fingers, thumb, and wrist

Finger, thumb, and wrist motion

Know the correct terms to describe the motions of your fingers, thumb, and wrist so you can accurately describe when you have pain and what makes it worse.

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Trigger Finger – Dr. Henley Drawings

Many common problems in the hand, wrist, and elbow can be illustrated with simple drawings. In this series of articles, I’ll show you an example of a simple drawing I use in the office to help patients visualize their problem a little better.

For each drawing, I’ll type out what I tell each patient when I draw this for them. That way you can get a little glimpse into the exam room and see how I educate patients.

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Joints of the Thumb – Language of Hand and Arm Surgery Series

joints of the thumb

My thumb hurts in the joint! Many patients want to use the right technical terms when talking with their physician, and this can certainly improve the efficiency of your office visit. In this article, I’ll quickly show you how to identify the joints in your thumb.

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Hand Surface Anatomy – Language of Hand and Arm Surgery Series

drawing of hand

Is it called the pinkie finger or the little finger? Many patients want to use the right technical terms when talking with their doctor, and this can improve the efficiency of your office visit. Here I’ll show you how to accurately discuss where your hand problem is by teaching you some hand surface anatomy.

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